What’s For Breakfast? Sweet Potato Eggs


SweetPotatoEggs

As a quick reminder: I was published last week!!! The recipe book that I was published in is a compilation of many of the best of Paleo’s chef-bloggers, and I am honored to be counted as one of their members! I’ve been through the recipes in the book, and likely will feature some of them here on this blog. As for my recipes in the book, they are some of my finest work, all entirely UPC home creations, and will be the same simple delightful foods that you all have come to expect from me! I highly recommend picking up a copy, as soon as possible, and working your way through this book. As I said above, it is filled, front to back, with some of the best work of the best chef-bloggers the Paleo world has to offer, and it’s just too good a book to miss out on!
Pick up your copy here.

I’ll be running a reminder of the Fat-Burning Chef recipe book all week, and then I’ll move on from it. I cannot recommend it highly enough, but for those of you who already have it, I will continue on with my regularly scheduled program.I was able to run to the ferry again this morning. The summer heat has held off, strangely, in favor of one of the wettest Junes on record, already the 6th wettest in NJ. And it’s the 17th. Is it possible that another rainstorm will push this year over the edge, and close the gap between being 6th and being 1st? Yes it is. Probable, maybe not – there’s a reason the top years have held their spots, though the record is held by 2003 right now, which isn’t that long ago… Perhaps we’ll see a new record this year after all! And if that means I can keep running to the ferry, then I’ll be just fine with that!

Sweet Potato Eggs, What you’ll need:

  • 1 large Sweet Potato, diced (Organic, of course)
  • 1 inch Ginger, diced
  • 3-4 Crimini Mushrooms, diced
  • 3 tablespoons Coconut Oil
  • 4 Eggs
  • Arugula for the salad bedding

Serves: 2
Prep and Cook time: 25 minutes

Add the sweet potato and 1 tablespoon of coconut oil to a pan on high. You’ll want to dice the sweet potato as finely as you can stand before adding it to the pan. The finer you dice it, the better the flavor and texture of the eggs will be. This recipe will work with large chunks of sweet potato, but it will end up eating more like home-fries than an omelet or scrambled eggs. As soon as the pan is sizzling, turn the heat down to medium-low, or about 3 out of 10. We want to cook the potato, but not to burn it.

While the potato is cooking, start dicing the ginger and mushrooms. These can be added to the pan as they’re finished, and in no particular order. As with the mushrooms, get these as small as your patience permits, but there is no need to be concerned with getting them microscopic. Just well diced is going to be fine – smaller pieces are more easily bound by the eggs, so whether you’re making omelets or scrambled, they will taste the best if you manage to get them cut down to fairly well diced pieces.

Add the second tablespoon of coconut oil after the ingredients are all in the pan, and stir the potato regularly, especially as you add the mushroom and ginger to the pan. As the potato starts to show the signs of being cooked, go ahead and add the eggs right on top of the potatoes, ginger, and mushrooms. As I have mentioned plenty of times before, I prefer to crack the eggs directly in to the pan when I’m making scrambled eggs. I’ve never really narrowed down why I like to do it that way, but that’s my preference. What that means is that I often spend the first 30-60 seconds of cooking spicing my eggs with the salt and pepper that I will be adding.

I turn the heat up to high after spicing the eggs, so that the pan is heating up while I’m mixing the eggs and filling together. And the rest is just scrambled eggs. You all know how to do this, right? Not quite… Here’s one final trick that I use when making scrambled eggs. Just as the eggs start to “take their shape,” I add the final tablespoon of coconut oil to the pan. You don’t want to do this too early, or the oil will just be absorbed and used up by the eggs. This is perfect to be done near the end of the cooking process, when the eggs are mostly done, and you’re still waiting for the perfect coloring. I like my eggs well-done, so I like them lightly browned on the outside. And this last little bit of coconut oil is as much for taste and texture as it is for the cooking. It makes the final product delicious!

Questions:

  • Do you prefer your flavored (like those above, with ingredients added) eggs scrambled, or as an omelet? It’s obvious what my answer is… My wife prefers her eggs as an omelet. Oh, and “Frittata” is not an acceptable answer here! That’s a separate dish entirely.
  • Which ingredients are your favorite additives?
  • Do you prefer to cook your eggs in bacon fat, butter, coconut oil, or olive oil? And why?

What’s For Breakfast? Slab Bacon and Eggs!


SlabBaconAndEggs

This Vermont Smoke And Cure slab bacon is so good I just can’t keep my paws off of it! There’s just something special about how this stuff is put together, and I can’t get enough! I had a slab of it sitting in the fridge since Tuesday night, and it’s been tantalizing me and my wife. But we’ve had a really busy week, and haven’t had the time to spend cooking it up. Until this morning… Somehow, the universe has conspired to force my hand. And thank the heavens for doing so!! Slab bacon for breakfast was probably even better than when we had the slab bacon for desert!

SlabBaconAndEggs2By now, you all know how I make my eggs. So I’ll just give you a real quick synopsis of how I made these eggs, and then move on to other business and some links I would like to share.

How I did these eggs:

These are celery and crimini mushroom eggs, cooked in the bacon grease of the slab bacon. Here’s how I did it: I started the slab bacon at just below medium (about 4 out of 10) and covered it to let it cook slowly and thoroughly. While it was quietly sizzling away I sliced up the celery and mushrooms, turning the bacon occasionally to give the slab even heat. As I finished with slicing the mushrooms and celery, there was enough bacon grease in the bacon pan to start cooking the celery and mushrooms for the eggs. So I poured off the bacon grease, comfortable in my knowledge that the slab bacon would produce all the grease I would be needing, and more. Cooking the celery and mushrooms, and then the scrambled eggs with the celery and mushrooms took all of 10 minutes, at most. So the eggs were finished before the slab bacon, but not too long before. And then breakfast was served!

The Links I Want to Share:

These are some posts that I encountered on marksdailyapple.com, a Paleo/Primal blog which I generally read everything he has to say (I commute for a significant length of time, so reading is something I do a lot of). This week, Mark has posted a couple of seriously great articles which I need to share with you.
The first article is a blog post Mark found on the Diet Heart Publishing blog, which puts the lie to the “Low Fat Heart-Healthy Diet” in an extraordinary way! It’s a long article, and worth every single second you spend reading it! I read it twice, just to make sure that I had fully digested the information on the post, and have shared it with everyone I speak with regularly. I think it should be absolutely foundational to anyone’s understanding of dietary guidance, regardless of your eventual consciously chosen diet.
The second article is a guest-post from a Poultry farmer about the Chicken available commercially.
It validates some of the gripes that I’ve been sharing with you all intermittently, as well as gives us quite a bit of further context on the subject so that we can be well informed in our buying choices. I highly recommend you read it!

  1. Illustrated History of Heart Disease 1825-2015
  2. What You Should Know About Poultry Production Claims

Questions:

  • Which blogs do you read the most often?
  • Which ones most often have articles which you cannot help but share?
  • Have you had any recently?
  • Share them with us too!

What’s For Breakfast? Celery Scrambled Eggs, Avocado, Papaya


CaribbeanBreakfast

Papaya, Eggs and Avocado. It’s the Urban Paleo Chef’s Paleo Digestion Meal!

Another of my Colombia meals, here is one of the breakfasts that I put together while I was there. I always try and get accommodations with a kitchen. That can turn a $1000 dollar food budget for vacation in to a $300 food budget for vacation, making big changes in the number of trips that I can afford to take each year. Then I can go out to some of the slightly more expensive restaurants and enjoy myself, the top quality foods they serve, and not be panicked that I will run out of budget for my other meals.

What you’ll need:

  • 1 cup sliced Celery
  • 4 Eggs
  • 2 cups sliced Papaya (fresh)
  • 1 large sliced Avocado

I love eggs. They’re a great source of quality cholesterol, valuable fats, and some great protein. Not to mention the vitamins and minerals that come with them. The eggs in Colombia were amazing! They had the most incredible orange coloring, like I wrote about in my “Are All Eggs Created Equal?” post a few months ago, indicating a very high quality egg. The extra orange coloring, as opposed to the dull-yellow that we see here in the US, indicates that the chickens were fed their natural diet of bugs, grubs, grass and seeds from foraging in a farm yard. A very nutritious diet for a chicken, and the diet necessary to produce the top quality eggs that have the bright orange colored yolk.

The fruits of Colombia are incredible! Walking down the fruit isles in Colombia is an eye-opening experience. Most of the street vendors have more varieties of fruits available than the best grocery stores here in the US. And the grocery stores in Colombia had several isles, filled with fruits which I had never seen before. I never even imagined the kinds of variety, and freshness, that the fruits could have! It was absolutely amazing!
I did a little of “try something new” and I worked a bit with the old stand by foods as well. I ate quite a bit of Avocado. And while that’s nothing new for me, it is most definitely a local food, and much more fresh and delicious there than I have had here. Similarly, papaya is a familiar food for me, but it was so fresh I thought it had been picked off a tree outside the store when I bought it. I brought it home and opened it up immediately.

I’ll do a post on the fruits of Colombia tomorrow. But for today, enjoy my breakfast!

Questions:

  • What are your favorite breakfast foods?
  • What are your most frequent breakfast foods?
  • What breakfast foods do you look for, make, or prefer when you’re traveling?