What’s For Dinner? Ginger Chicken Soup


GingerChickenSoup

UPC’s Ginger Chicken Soup

There are a million varieties of chicken soup. That’s an accurate count, too, I think. Actually, if anything, I’m underestimating. There are probably at least 1 million and 1 varieties. At least. In fact, my wife and I end up with a new variety of chicken soup almost every night. Lately, we’ve been cooking up some chicken soup every night, re-using the leftovers from the night before, and adding in a new set of ingredients – some the same, some different. We’ve had some really delicious versions, and some that aren’t really worth getting all excited about. That’s cooking for you!

This Ginger Chicken Soup was one of the more impressive versions that we’ve put together over the past week. The way that the ginger brightened the flavor of the soup was amazing! It brought out all the best flavors of the other vegetables that I used. And the way that ginger works with chicken is like magic! I’m really going to have to use some ginger on some baked chicken now – I’ve done it extensively with stewed meats, chicken included, but now I have got to try it baked!

UPC’s Ginger Chicken Soup:

  • 2 Whole Chicken Legs (skin, bones, everything)
  • 2 inches Ginger, diced
  • 1/2 Jicama Root, chopped (would work with a sweet potato or diakon too; though that would result in a very different flavor)
  • 1 medium Carrot, chopped
  • 1 medium Golden Beet, chopped
  • 1 medium Zucchini, chopped
  • 3 sprigs Basil Leaves
  • 3 sprigs Basil Stalks, diced
  • Spices: Sea Salt, Turmeric, Sage
  • 6 cups Water

Serves: 2-4 (2 with a lot of leftovers)
Cook time: 45 minutes

1. Put the chicken legs and spices in the water and cook on high, covered.

2. While the chicken is heating up, chop the ingredients and add them to the pot. Here is the order that I add ingredients:

  • Ginger first (need the flavor!)
  • Carrots (hardest; needs the most time in the water to soften)
  • Jicama (or Sweet Potato)
  • Golden Beet (Very different flavor profile from red beet – I would use Sweet Potato or Rutabaga instead of Golden Beet if you need to substitute)
  • Diced Basil Stalks (Yes, dice up the stalks of the basil sprigs – these cook quite well, and the flavor is subtle but delicious)
  • Zucchini

3. Let the water boil, still on high heat (use a big pot) for 10 minutes.

4. Take the chicken legs out of the pot and pull them apart, shredding the meat and extracting the bones. Put the chicken back into the pot once it’s been shredded.
Note: I do this step right in the pot, shredding the chicken and extracting the bones all without removing them from the pot. If you’re going to do this, be very careful not to get burned by the steam or splashing.

5. Let the soup continue to cook for another 5 minutes. Now serve and enjoy!

Questions:

  • How much do you enjoy chicken soup?
  • Seriously, how much do you love chicken soup?!?
  • Is chicken soup a year-round comfort food for you, or do you typically start turning to it as the weather turns?
  • What other soups are your fall and winter comfort foods?
  • Are you adventurous with your chicken soups?
  • Are you adventurous with your other soups?
  • What kinds of adventures have worked out well for you?
  • What has failed miserably?

What’s For Dinner? – Basil, Bacon and Caramelized Onion Stuffed Mushrooms


StuffedMushroom_Take7

UPC’s Basil, Bacon and Caramelized Onion Stuffed Mushrooms

Inspiration can come from a lot of different places, for a lot of different things. I love it when inspiration strikes me, and I am most definitely the kind of guy who will pull over to the side of the road to take a picture or write something down. I’m not so much of a sing-in-the-shower person, but you shouldn’t be the least bit surprised if I were to break into song while standing on the subway platform, or walking down a crowded street. Why? I was inspired. Interestingly, most often when inspiration strikes me, I’ve completely forgotten what inspired me by the time the inspired action begins. It’s one of the reasons why I believe in inspiration so thoroughly. Fortunately, for those really life-changing events, the ones that have a lasting impact on my life, I usually remember the inspiration for those. For instance: I remember what inspired me and my wife to go Paleo. In fact, I can trace that particular decision through an interesting path of choices, all made possible by one single moment of inspiration (and not a terribly pleasant one, I might add) almost a year before we did finally make the decision. And, depending on how you look at it, that particular moment, that inspiration, may in fact be responsible for my blogging as well. Sometimes it’s amazing to consider the implications that one action may have such lasting impressions! If I could, I’d go Paleo AGAIN – though I’m certainly not willing to give it up first…

My inspiration, as small as it may seem, for today’s meal was a box of mushrooms. Some mushrooms just say to me “I want to be chopped up in little bits and eaten in a salad.” Some of them say “I want to be sliced thin and made into a soup.” And these mushrooms that you see here, they were jumping up and down, screaming to be made into stuffed mushrooms as loud as they could! Honestly, I don’t understand how everyone else in the grocery store wasn’t annoyed by all the ruckus.
On a slightly more serious note: I saw these mushrooms and was instantly and immediately inspired to make stuffed mushrooms with them. Unlike bursting in to song, stuffed mushrooms take some preparation, consideration, and planning. I knew that they wanted to be made in to stuffed mushrooms, but I still had to figure out what to stuff them with! Not to worry; it came to me. Or, rather, my wife and I spent an agonizing 30 minutes spit-balling ideas back and forth until one stuck. Like inspiration, I knew it once we had it. So, here it is!

UPC’s Basil, Bacon and Caramelized  Onion Stuffed Mushrooms; What you’ll need:

  • Large Mushrooms (I used 20 oz) – any large cup-mushroom (white button, crimini, etc.); or cake the stuffing on top of a cap-mushroom (portobello, shiitake, etc)
  • Mushroom Stems, diced
  • 1 lb Bacon, cooked and crumbled (Top-Quality only! 🙂 )
  • 1 large Red Onion, diced and caramelized (also called “Spanish Onion”)
  • 1 medium Rutabaga, finely chopped.
  • 2 cloves Garlic, diced
  • 5-6 sprigs Fresh Basil, diced (including the stems – they add to the texture)
  • Several Fresh Basil Leaves, diced (keep separate from above)
  • Spices: Savory, Anise, Marjoram, Turmeric

Serves: 4-8
Cook and Prep Time: 60 minutes

2GarlicOnionBaconStuffedMushrooms-Bacon1. Cook and crumble the bacon. Drain the pan of most of the bacon grease (to be used in some other culinary creation!).

2. Add the onions and rutabaga to the remainder of the bacon grease and begin cooking on medium heat. Stir regularly (every 1-2 minutes).

1GarlicOnionBaconStuffedMushrooms-Mushrooms

Remove the stem, cut out the lip, and scrape out the gills.

3. Remove the stems of the mushrooms, cut out the lip of the cup, then scrape the gills off the inside of the cup (or cap, if you’re using caps) of the mushroom with a spoon. This makes more room for the stuffing.
Note: Don’t know what the gills are? Check here.

4. After about 10 minutes of cook time, add the garlic and mushroom stems to the onions and rutabaga and continue to cook and stir for another 5 minutes, or until the onions are thoroughly caramelized.

5. Turn off the heat, add the spices and diced basil and mix thoroughly.

5GarlicOnionBaconStuffedMushrooms-Stuffing-LastStir

Stir in the spices and basil with the caramelized onions and rutabaga.

6. Pre-heat the oven to 350.

7. Spoon some stuffing in to each mushroom, making sure that they’re filled to the top, but not over filled. The mushrooms will shrink while baking.

6GarlicOnionBaconStuffedMushrooms-PreBake

Don’t over-fill the mushrooms; they shrink while baking.

8. Grease the bottom of each mushroom thoroughly (yes, you can use the bacon grease 🙂 ) and place the mushrooms in a baking pan with enough space between them so that they’re not touching.

9. Put the pan in the oven once it’s up to temperature; set the timer for 15 minutes.

10. When the timer dings, sprinkle the remaining diced basil on top of the mushrooms, and serve and enjoy!

Optional: If you’re a cheese person: you can add cheese to the recipe at the end, while you’re adding the basil and spices to the stuffing.

StuffedMushroom_Take6

Questions:

  • What kinds of inspiration strikes you?
  • Do you ever have inspiration that you can act on immediately? Do you?
  • Do you ever have food inspiration?
  • How would you use this stuffed mushroom recipe?
  • How might you change it to suit your needs?
  • Are there other stuffed mushroom recipes that you like?
  • Would you serve this as a meal, or an appetizer?
  • What would you serve this with?

What’s For Dinner? Baked Vegetable-Mustard-Marinade Chicken


BakedVegetableMarinadeChicken

UPC’s Vegetable Mustard Marinade Chicken

I’ve had a hectic couple of days! On Sunday I wrote what I had hoped would be a rousing response to a comment I received on a “4 Steps to Successfully Eating Out” post I wrote many months ago. I called my response “Am I Really Allergic To Wheat?” It’s no surprise that the nay-sayers came out in droves to give me their opinion on the matter. I received comments from the three main camps that you might expect. They all fell in to one of these:

  1. “It’s not a real allergy until a doctor has diagnosed it.”
  2. “My allergy is more important than yours.”
  3. “It’s not an allergy if you don’t get Anaphylactic Shock from it.”

It’s difficult to be trying to have an open and honest discussion about this sort of topic. This is a challenging topic to have among people with generally like minds! But throw in the fact that I’m opening my discussion up to the public, and all sorts of other opinions will start to show their faces too. While I want people to participate, I find it difficult and challenging to facilitate a beneficial discussion when it so quickly devolves into the dirty kind of arguments where the only “Out” is when someone gets hurt, insulted, or gives up because there’s no intellectual middle-ground. That’s not a good discussion for anyone.
So keep your eyes peeled at the end of this post. I’ll be bringing the above up in my Questions section, since it’s important to me what you all think.

Vegetable Mustard Marinaded Chicken; What you’ll need:

  • 1lb Whole Chicken Legs, skin on (this recipe will work with any cut; but it’s best on dark meat)
  • 1 cup Carrots, chopped
  • 1/2 cup Lemongrass, sliced
  • 1/2 cup Chives, chopped (will work just as well with green onions, scallions or leeks)
  • 1-inch Ginger, sliced
  • ChickenMarinadeVeggies1

    Just vegetables, before liquid is added

    2 tablespoons Whole-Seed Yellow Mustard (optional: Make your own with white vinegar, water, mustard seed, turmeric, sea salt, and ground mustard seed)

  • 4 tablespoons Balsamic Vinegar (optional: white or apple cider vinegar will work, but will change the flavor dramatically – consider your flavor carefully)
  • 1/2 cup Olive Oil
  • 1 cup Water

ChickenMarinadeVeggies2Serves: 4
Prep Time: 1 day
Cook time: 40 minutes

1. First put the chicken in a marinade container, then combine all remaining ingredients.

2. Close the container and seal it, then shake the container thoroughly, making sure that all ingredients have mixed.

ChickenMarinadeVeggies3

After shaking thoroughly

3. Store the chicken in the refrigerator for at least a day. Shake vigorously at least twice during that time.

ChickenMarinadeVeggies_After

The oil thickens in the fridge – this is a good thing, it locks the flavor in!

4. 60 minutes before meal time, pre-heat the oven on to 375, and take the chicken out of the fridge.

5. Using coconut oil or a nut oil (I used walnut oil) grease an oven-safe pan, and put the chicken on the pan.

6. Bake uncovered for 40-45 minutes (depends on how crispy you like the skin). Now serve and enjoy!

Questions:

  • Do you enjoy it when I do a “Weekend Food Commentary” on a hard-to-discuss topic like I did this past weekend?
  • Would you like to see these more frequently? Keeping in mind that it’s been months since I did the last one.
  • Are there any particular hard-to-discuss topics that you’d like me to review and discuss?
  • Chicken Questions:
  • What kinds of chicken recipes do you like the most? Baked/fried/soup/etc?
  • I’m playing around with some “Crusted Chicken” recipes, at the moment – any suggestions?
  • I’ve got some ideas for some chicken meals, and chicken appetizers… Any chance we could do a chicken dessert? I know – that might be pushing it a bit… 🙂

What’s For Dinner? Slow-Cooked Smoked Babyback Ribs


SlowCookedSmokedBabybackRibs

UPC’s Slow-Cooked Smoked Babyback Ribs

I’ve been slowly but surely refining my basic process for cooking up a “Smoked” meat dish, in the comfort of your own home using a slow-cooker or crock pot. I consider these ribs to be the final proof of the process for that. So the good news (other than that I had a delicious dinner, and loved every minute of it) is that I can finally document my “Slow-Cooker Smoked” process and start to build some recipes around it. Keep your eyes peeled for this in the future as I intend to be sharing many of these recipes with you!

As far as this recipe is concerned, you could do this using the “Smoked” process which I will document separately, or you could do these in a more “traditional” slow-cooker process. In fact, this recipe will work well for a grilled meal as well. All you would do is change this recipe slightly to do the final cooking on the grill rather than in a slow-cooker. Also, since a grill is quite a bit hotter than a slow-cooker, the cook time for grilling these will be somewhere in the neighborhood of between 20 and 40 minutes, depending on the temperature you use. A higher cook-time will give you a faster turn around. It will also sear the outside of the ribs more, which may be preferable. A lower temperature and longer cook time will encourage the use of sauces and other flavors to change the flavor of the ribs.

Slow-Cooked Smoked Babyback Ribs; What you’ll need:

  • 1 large rack Babyback Ribs
  • 1/2 cup Olive Oil
  • 1/2 cup Balsamic Vinegar (you can use a flavored one too, if you have one)
  • 1 cup water (filtered, please!)
  • Spices: Turmeric, Sage, Sea Salt

Serves: 2 (depending on the size of the rib rack; and how good it is!)
Cook and Prep time: 1.5 days.

1. In a pan or on a griddle, thoroughly brown the ribs on both sides. Do this using high heat – you want the outside to be browned, but you don’t want to cook the meat on the inside much, if any.

BabybackRibs_Browning

See the red showing on the edge of the ribs? Brown the outside quickly, but don’t cook the slab of ribs.

2. Put the ribs, spices, and oil and vinegar in a marinating container and put it away for a day.

3. About 6-8 hours before meal time, dump the ribs and marinade all in to a slow cooker or crock pot and turn it on to low.

4. Serve and enjoy!!

BabybackRibs_Spiced

For Grilling:
Instead of slow-cooking for 6-8 hours, slow cook for 1 hour. Then finish cooking on the grill on high heat for 20-40 minutes, brushing the marinade onto the ribs to keep them moist.

To do the “Smoked Slow-Cooked” Version:

  1. BabybackRibs_SmokingPlatformSave the bones from your last ribs in the freezer (or you can buy some bones from your local butcher – most have some for sale; If you buy, I’d cook these up at least once for some Bone Broth first!).
  2. Follow the slow-cooker instructions steps 1 and 2 above.
  3. Before above step 3: Thaw and arrange the bones across the bottom of the slow-cooker so that the meat will be lifted up above the marinade liquid.
  4. Return to the slow-cooker step 3 instructions, though this time drizzle the marinade over the top of the meat several times during the 8-hours of cook time.

This is a fascinating idea that I’ve been playing around with since this post, many months ago. What happens is the marinade will heat up, evaporating the liquids, and will effectively steam the meat slab suspended above it. If that were all that happened, this would be somewhat different than it ends up being. At the same time, the oils in the marinade allow the slow-cooker to over-cook the bones that were left in the bottom of the pan, letting them caramelize and smoke the meat above it. The intentional overcooking of the bones making the smoke, along with the flavors in the marinade, combine to create the same effect as using a smoker, while allowing you to do the whole thing relatively safely in your own kitchen.
As a note on this: I did recently find a crack in my crock pot, and it’s entirely possible that it was doing this that ruined it. Even using the Low heat setting will result in a lot of heat being funneled in to the slow-cooker, and since there’s not a lot of liquid in there to absorb the heat (that’s kind of our intention) it will end up causing the pot itself to heat up quite a lot. Of course, the benefit to this is that the bones on the bottom, since they’re touching the pot, will heat up a lot and smoke the meat. And it’s delicious! On the other hand, I suggest paying extra attention to the crock pot; keep it away from walls and potentially flammable stuff on the counter, and only do this when you’re home to monitor it regularly.

Questions:

  • Do you like smoked/cured meat?
  • Have you ever smoked your own meat?
  • Will you be trying the slow-cooker smoked meat steps/process that I’ve outlined above?
  • What kinds of meat would you be most interested in smoking?
  • Do you have a smoker? How often do you use it?
  • What kinds of sides would you serve with this meal?
  • What kind of dessert would you serve with this meal?

Chicken Soup for the… Just Chicken Vegetable Soup


ChickenVegetableSoup

Just Chicken Vegetable Soup

I hope you enjoyed the post title! I had fun with that. I also had a short story all thought up to go with the title, and I thought it was pretty funny at the time. Unfortunately, all I can remember right now is that I thought up a story and thought it was pretty funny. Sometimes writing does that to me. Sometimes it clears my mind of all other things, and something surprising comes out of my fingers (yes, I write with my fingers, not a pen). Almost like magic. And sometimes I don’t forget the story, and I can relay it back to you all with a humored grin on my face, despite that there’s a pretty good chance that no one else thinks I’m funny…

Just chicken vegetable soup. I really enjoy soup season. Fall, winter, and spring here in NYC is prime soup season for me and my wife. And we always know that soup season has kicked off with aplomb once I’ve made the first chicken soup of the season. It’s almost a “Soup Season Tradition” for us. Perhaps we should call it that.
One of the things that I like the most about Soup Season is the use of spices. I do a lot of steak with nothing but turmeric or pepper. I like the flavor of steak, and only really want to hide that flavor with spices when I’m making something “fancy”. But when it comes to soups, it’s all about the spices! Of course, you don’t just grab a random handful of spice jars and just use them. You carefully, artfully choose the spices you’re going to include in order to maximize your enjoyment, and the specific flavors, of the dish. Today’s key players are: fresh sliced lemongrass, fresh chopped rosemary, and turmeric (sorry, not fresh).

What you’ll need:

  • 1 lb Chicken Thigh Meat
  • 2 medium Yellow Squashes, sliced
  • 10 oz Crimini Mushrooms, sliced
  • 3-4 medium Carrots, sliced
  • 1 cup sliced Fennel Bulb
  • 1 cup sliced Celery
  • 4-6 tablespoons fresh Rosemary, sliced
  • 4-6 tablespoons sliced fresh Lemongrass
  • 2 tablespoons Turmeric
  • Sea Salt and Pepper to taste

Serves: 6-8 (I always make plenty for leftovers)
Cook and Prep time: 60 minutes (I prep the spices and vegetables while the soup cooks)

1. In the soup pot, add the chicken and several cups of water and cook on high, covered.

2. Slice the lemongrass first, and add it to the soup as it is ready, followed by adding the turmeric, then chopping up the rosemary and adding it to the pot.

3. Let the chicken and spices cook for 5-10 minutes, on high heat, before adding anything else to the pot.
Note: This is a good time to prepare the other vegetables.

4. After the chicken has had some time to cook through, add the carrots, fennel, and mushrooms to the soup, as well as refreshing the water. Always make sure that there is more than enough water to fully submerge all of the ingredients (keeping in mind, of course, that the vegetables float…).

5. Allow another 5-10 minutes of cook time, then uncover the pot and using a serving fork and some tongs, fish out the chicken chunks, and shred the chicken back in to the pot, leaving it as shredded as you have the patience to make it. I do this instead of cutting it in to chunks, because I like the texture of the shredded chicken much better than chunks of it.

6. About 15 minutes before meal time add the remaining ingredients to the soup. Again, refresh the water in the soup so that there is plenty of water to cover all of the vegetables.

7. Just before serving, add the salt and pepper, and increase the water of the soup to the point that there’s the right amount of broth to suit your tastes (some people like a lot of broth, some people like less…). And serve and enjoy!

Questions:

  • Do you ever forget something right as you’re about to say it? Or write it?
  • What is your favorite kind of soup?
  • When you do chicken soup, which spices do you use?
  • Do you prefer your chicken soup to be a “slow-cooked” meal, or something you throw together in a quick 30-minute prep session, just before dinner time?
  • What meal really personifies the beginning of soup season for you?

What’s For Dinner? Slab Bacon and Steak Heaped with Caramelized Onions


BeefAndBacon

Slab Bacon, Steak Heaped with Caramelized Onions, and Avocado

If your mouth is watering just looking at that picture, you’re not alone. As much as I enjoyed the food, looking at it is almost as good – believe it or not! I had had a hard day at work, as had my wife. We were both coming home a bit late; my wife a bit later than me. So, what better way to unwind at the end of a really long day than with some of the most savory of the savory food category? Well, this slab bacon, as I’ve mentioned in my Slab Bacon Bacon Project Post, has been treating me and my wife every bit as well as it did when we first bought it and tried it. Without a doubt, this is the best commercial bacon we’ve had the pleasure of eating.

This meal does very well with additional cook time, so if you know that dinner may be delayed, this is a great meal to allow to simply keep cooking on a lower temperature. It’s a great meal to prepare for dinner parties, allowing the host to let dinner time be socially dictated, rather than when the dinner bell rings (it also allows the friends who got caught in traffic get there and still eat with everyone else!).

What you’ll need:

  • 1 lb Slab Bacon
  • 1 lb Grass-Fed Rib Eye Steak (can use other cuts)
  • 2 medium Onions, chopped
  • 1 large Avocado
  • Spices: Turmeric, Black Pepper (fresh ground), “Herb De Provence” spice mix

Serves: 2-4 (depending on how hungry you are…)
Cook and prep time: 70 minutes

1. Heat the steak up in a pan on high until the steak is sizzling loudly.

2. Turn the heat down to medium-low, about 3 out of 10, and as soon as the sizzling stops, flip the steak.

3. Put the slab bacon in a separate pan and cook, covered, on medium-low heat, or about 3 out of 10.

4. Add the chopped onions around the steak in the steak pan.
Optional: Using 4-5 medium chopped onions, you can cook them in the bacon pan instead. This will produce leftover caramelized onions for quite a few meals.

5. Spice the steak liberally and cover the pan allowing the steak to cook.

6. Lay the bacon down on a new side every 10 minutes.

7. About 5 minutes before meal time, turn the steak pan up to high heat, take the steak out, and stir the onions thoroughly.

8. Alternately leaving the steak on top of the onions, and stirring, keep the onions cooking and stirring for 5 minutes on high heat.

Now serve and enjoy!

Questions:

  • What is your favorite dinner-party meal?
  • Which is the “Side Dish” in this meal: the steak, or the slab bacon?
  • Would you use something other than caramelized onions? How would you cook them?
  • How do you and your friends determine dinner time during dinner parties? When the food is ready, or when the guests are ready?
  • What kinds of drinks would you serve with this meal? Any specific brand/year?
  • Is there a difference between friends for dinner parties, and family? Do you cook differently? Do you clean, or set a different table?

What’s For Dinner? Maduro Beef Picadillo


MaduroBeefPicadillo

UPC’s Maduro Beef Picadillo

This has been a LONG week for me! It has nothing to do with the holiday this weekend, and waiting for the weekend to come. It’s actually been so long partly because of social engagements, and partly because of the race last weekend. I’ve been recovering from the race pretty much the entire week, and it’s been a rough recovery. I’ve only had two runs so far this week, and have had to focus most of my workouts this week on strength training. While that’s not so bad in a general sense, the reason that’s tough right now is that I’m still in training! I have 3.5 weeks to go before the big day, a short-list of pretty serious training gaps that I need to try to fill in, and only about 2 weeks where training will even be valuable for me before I will need to start tapering my speed training. Or, stated a different way: I’m feeling a bit of the pressure of race-day approaching. And it would be easier for me if my training were more normal right now. I know, the race this past weekend was part of training, and so is the recovery I’m going through. But that doesn’t make it any easier for me! But enough about training, on to today’s Maduro Beef Picadillo

I do Picadillo Beef often in my home. It’s a fantastic recipe, easy to make, it’s varied enough in flavor that it goes with any season, and nearly any side dish. It really is one of the most versatile recipes in my arsenal, and my wife and I absolutely love to eat it. The best part about it is: it’s really easy to make extra, and it’s every bit as good the next time you get to it!

UPC’s Maduro Beef Picadillo

  • 1 lb Grass-Fed Beef
  • 2 Maduros, sliced and baked, then chopped (See Baked Maduros for directions)
  • 1/2 cup Raisins (I use Organic Thompson Raisins)
  • 1 cup Green Olives (I use Organic Olives)
  • Salt/Pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon Coconut Oil

Serves: 2 (with a little left over)
Cook and Prep time: 15 minutes

1. In a pan, add the beef and maduros along with the coconut oil and cook on medium heat.

2. Stir regularly until the beef is mostly browned, with only a little bit of redness to it.

3. As soon as the beef is mostly browned, add the olives and raisins, and turn the heat up to medium-high, or about a 7 out of 10.

4. Stir this constantly, cooking for another minute or so, until all the beef has browned.

5. Serve and enjoy!

Notes: This is also delicious when combined with hot or spicy spices, like paprika, or other pepper-based spices. The heat melds quite well with the sweetness of the maduros and raisins.

Questions:

  • How is your training going?
  • Have you had a race recently?
  • How is your recovery generally?
  • Do you do anything to assist your recovery? Ice? Hot compression? Foam-Rolling or massages?