What’s For Dinner? Ginger Chicken Soup


GingerChickenSoup

UPC’s Ginger Chicken Soup

There are a million varieties of chicken soup. That’s an accurate count, too, I think. Actually, if anything, I’m underestimating. There are probably at least 1 million and 1 varieties. At least. In fact, my wife and I end up with a new variety of chicken soup almost every night. Lately, we’ve been cooking up some chicken soup every night, re-using the leftovers from the night before, and adding in a new set of ingredients – some the same, some different. We’ve had some really delicious versions, and some that aren’t really worth getting all excited about. That’s cooking for you!

This Ginger Chicken Soup was one of the more impressive versions that we’ve put together over the past week. The way that the ginger brightened the flavor of the soup was amazing! It brought out all the best flavors of the other vegetables that I used. And the way that ginger works with chicken is like magic! I’m really going to have to use some ginger on some baked chicken now – I’ve done it extensively with stewed meats, chicken included, but now I have got to try it baked!

UPC’s Ginger Chicken Soup:

  • 2 Whole Chicken Legs (skin, bones, everything)
  • 2 inches Ginger, diced
  • 1/2 Jicama Root, chopped (would work with a sweet potato or diakon too; though that would result in a very different flavor)
  • 1 medium Carrot, chopped
  • 1 medium Golden Beet, chopped
  • 1 medium Zucchini, chopped
  • 3 sprigs Basil Leaves
  • 3 sprigs Basil Stalks, diced
  • Spices: Sea Salt, Turmeric, Sage
  • 6 cups Water

Serves: 2-4 (2 with a lot of leftovers)
Cook time: 45 minutes

1. Put the chicken legs and spices in the water and cook on high, covered.

2. While the chicken is heating up, chop the ingredients and add them to the pot. Here is the order that I add ingredients:

  • Ginger first (need the flavor!)
  • Carrots (hardest; needs the most time in the water to soften)
  • Jicama (or Sweet Potato)
  • Golden Beet (Very different flavor profile from red beet – I would use Sweet Potato or Rutabaga instead of Golden Beet if you need to substitute)
  • Diced Basil Stalks (Yes, dice up the stalks of the basil sprigs – these cook quite well, and the flavor is subtle but delicious)
  • Zucchini

3. Let the water boil, still on high heat (use a big pot) for 10 minutes.

4. Take the chicken legs out of the pot and pull them apart, shredding the meat and extracting the bones. Put the chicken back into the pot once it’s been shredded.
Note: I do this step right in the pot, shredding the chicken and extracting the bones all without removing them from the pot. If you’re going to do this, be very careful not to get burned by the steam or splashing.

5. Let the soup continue to cook for another 5 minutes. Now serve and enjoy!

Questions:

  • How much do you enjoy chicken soup?
  • Seriously, how much do you love chicken soup?!?
  • Is chicken soup a year-round comfort food for you, or do you typically start turning to it as the weather turns?
  • What other soups are your fall and winter comfort foods?
  • Are you adventurous with your chicken soups?
  • Are you adventurous with your other soups?
  • What kinds of adventures have worked out well for you?
  • What has failed miserably?

8 thoughts on “What’s For Dinner? Ginger Chicken Soup

  1. Pingback: What’s For Dinner? Ginger Chicken Soup | Paleo Digest

  2. Ginger in the soup! Love it!
    It’s a very traditional thing for Chinese folks to put a bit of ginger in the soup or rice porridge. It is said to be able to calm the upset stomach. πŸ˜€
    Native Indonesians, however, always put celery in their soups. I heard that it can cure migraine and respiratory problems.

    • I use celery a lot, and it’s in most of the 1 million and 1 versions of chicken soup. I chose to skip it in this soup for flavor reasons – the flavor profile that I was looking for was more geared toward skipping the celery this time.

      • Ah, I see!
        I’m the only one in the family who actually likes celery. I only use it when I cook for myself. πŸ˜€

      • I love it in soups and stews – the flavor is light and subtle, and the texture is awesome in a soup or stew! It’s also great for caramelizing; it has a really great flavor when it’s been slow-cooked!
        I occasionally use it in salads. Raw, it has a strong flavor. I’m always very careful about utilizing flavors to support or improve the overall flavor profile that I want in a meal, so since celery is such a strong flavor when it’s raw, I am always careful about how I use it. It’s great when combined with lime juice, parsnips, and arugula as a side salad. You can search my archives for a “Twisted Salad” and see that I’ve used it to great effect like that!

      • Will do!
        We usually consume it fresh, mostly as garnish. We are not so creative when it comes to celery. πŸ˜€

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