What’s For Dinner? – Slow Cooked Pork Loin, Cumin Roasted Carrots, Avocado


BoneStewedPorkLoin

Plus a bonus: a quick guide on making Bone Broth, and one of the things that you can do with it.

How often do you have a really tough day? I mean, the kind of day that makes you want to throw your baseball cap on the floor, step on it, and spit at the ref? Think about that for a second… Now, how many of those really tough days do you know about before they’re going to happen? Be honest. I’ll bet the answer is more than you really want to admit. Certainly not all of them, but plenty. Well, I have days like that too. And I see most of them coming a week away; and a good portion of the rest I get at least a day’s warning on. They’re not that hard to spot! If I pay attention, I can even catch the signs that a rough day is on it’s way before it full sets in. Now, let’s also be honest: there’s not much you can do to stop a rough day from happening, right? But there is something that you can do to cope with it.

Today’s post is all about my personal coping mechanism for a rough day. When I know a rough day is coming on, I throw some meat in the slow-cooker, spice and add ingredients, and set it for a long, slow cook. There is nothing that picks me back up after a long hard day than coming home to that amazing smell of slow-cooked meat, vegetables, and the right combination of spices. And then, after the weight is lifted off my shoulders by that heavenly smell, I get to sit down for a meal with it! And let me tell you: this really sets me back to calm, cool, relaxed, and happy. It’s as relaxing as a nap!

What you’ll need:

  • 2lb Pork Loin Roast (can be bigger!)
  • Slow cooker or crock-pot
  • Bone Broth
  • Water
  • Carrots
  • Cumin
  • Coconut Oil
  • Avocado

I have a personal cutoff of 1 hour of cooking per pound of meat cooked in order to call it “Slow Cooked”. So if you’re only cooking a 1 lb steak, you have to cook it for a full hour to be able to call it slow-cooked. This is important, because the cooking style and ingredients that you would use are drastically different when you’re stretching the cook time of a 1lb steak out for a full hour. I mean, seriously, we can finish cooking a 1lb steak in 10 minutes! Why do we need to let it take a whole hour? And the answer, of course, is because slow-cooked food is different! And sometimes different is better.

For Crock-Pot meals, I extend that to about double: it’s not really done until it’s been in the pot for at least 2 hours per pound of meat. So for a 2lb pork loin roast, I’ll cook that for no less than 4 hours. That means that I have to be very careful with my ingredients – a lot can go wrong when you’re cooking a 2lb roast for 4 hours!

Here’s how I did it:

I’ve been working on some bone broth for a little while now. As any of you who have made bone soup knows, this can be a fairly long and time consuming process! Fortunately, mixed in a little along the way, it’s also a perfect opportunity to make some stewed meat!

Making Bone Soup: Buy some of your favorite cuts of grass-fed beef, with the bones in. Eat the beef, and that same night, boil the bones in some water with a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar for an hour, or so, then put them in a freezer container, and freeze them. Repeat this process until you have a solid 2 liters worth of bones in water (all frozen now). Now you’re ready for bone broth. You may want to save up more bones in water if you’re using a larger crock pot or slow cooker.

Put all the frozen bones in a crock pot or other slow-cooker, add water until it’s at least 2/3 full. Add sliced celery to the stock, and turn it on to a low-boiling setting and let it cook all day. Depending on how you like your bone broth, you may choose to take it out at the end of one day and throw away what hasn’t dissolved yet. I think that there’s way too much goodness inside the actual structure of the bones themselves to throw them away, and I will keep cooking this for several days until I can break down the actual bones in to something edible. And boy does this make a tasty base for all sorts of things! As a note: I renew the water daily while the broth cooks.

At some point, after you’ve started your Bone Broth, you may be looking for that sweet comfort food that stewed meat can be at the end of a long day. When that happens, just pop a roast in with the bone broth, add some spices on top of the roast, and let it cook along with the bone broth for the day. This will be ready for you whenever you return home, and delicious!

When you get home, go ahead and throw some sliced carrots, a cup of water, and cumin in a pot on the stove. Let this cook at a rolling boil for several minutes, uncovered, so that the water will evaporate off. As the water evaporates, add about 1/2 tablespoon of Coconut oil per carrot (so for 2 carrots, use 1 tablespoon of coconut oil) and stir the carrots up. Once the water is mostly boiled off, reduce the heat to low, cover, and let this keep cooking on low until you’re ready to eat.

Serving:

Serve the carrots and avocado first. Once you’re ready to plate the meat, get out a pepper grinder, some Italian seasoning, and some sea salt. Using tongs (the meat will be very tender) pull the meat out of the slow cooker and put it on the plate. Sprinkle the spices over the meat lightly, and serve hot. And enjoy!

Questions:

  • What is your go-to comfort food when you know you’re going to have a rough day?
  • Do you have a different comfort food if the rough day sneaks up on you?
  • What about your comfort food really makes you relax? Is it a reminder of your childhood food? Something else?

3 thoughts on “What’s For Dinner? – Slow Cooked Pork Loin, Cumin Roasted Carrots, Avocado

  1. Pingback: What’s For Dinner? – Slow Cooked Pork Loin, Cumin Roasted Carrots, Avocado | Paleo Digest

  2. My favorite comfort food is a smoothie – it’s what I used to eat pre-paleo days, so when I have them now (but still paleo-ized), I get those comfort feelings inside. I know the paleo-sphere frowns upon smoothies but I think they are ok for a “treat” once in a while.

    • That’s a great comfort food! And I completely agree – having them on occasion as a “treat” is probably pretty healthy. What do you put in them? The last one I had was grapefruit and kale – and it was really tasty!

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