Weekend Food Commentary


2 uncooked eggs in a bowl; one is pastured and bright orange, very healthy looking while the other is organic but not pastured and shows; it's coloring is yellow, smaller, and almost looks like another species of egg.

Photo courtesy of PaleoHacks.com

Are All Eggs Created Equal?

So, as you’ve guessed from my post title, I’ve decided that I will be sharing some of my own personal thoughts and observations in one or two posts on the weekends. And the truth is that “food” encompasses more than just recipes, food photography, and eating, right? “Food” in fact encompasses quite a lot more than just eating. So, what about food has caught my attention today?

“The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, he is one who asks the right questions.” – Claude Levi Strauss

My post today was inspired by a discussion my wife and I had with a dear friend of ours yesterday. I was astonished when she let me know that she used to love the whole egg, but that in 1993, or so, she stopped liking the flavor of the egg yolk. I was interested, and spent a few moments musing about when, exactly, CAFO eggs may have become mainstream. 1993 is as likely a year as any, as far as I can tell. So in today’s post, I would like to share a little of my thoughts on Eggs.

2 uncooked eggs in a bowl; one is pastured and bright orange, very healthy looking while the other is organic but not pastured and shows; it's coloring is yellow, smaller, and almost looks like another species of egg.

Photo courtesy of PaleoHacks.com

The picture I posted above is an amazingly illustrative descriptor of the difference in eggs when you go from pastured, farm raised eggs, to animal feed operations, even if they are organic (as they are in the picture above).

WeakEggs

Notice that the left egg has a much more rich, orange color. This comes from the ceratin which the chicken ingests from grass while hunting for their natural food: bugs, grubs, and worms. In addition to providing additional color and protein, the grass in that chicken’s diet would also increase other nutrients, and significantly enhance the flavor. By comparison, take a look at the washed-out, weak yellow color of the bowl of eggs posted to the right here. These eggs make even the organic egg (the one on the right) in the first picture look good!

In my opinion, of course, there is a tremendous difference. Even if I couldn’t taste, or see the difference, I am far more likely to trust nature than some factory. And by nature, what I mean is that a pastured chicken gets to seek out whatever food it believes is best for it. Do we leave soy-protein-nuggets for lions in the Savannah? In fact, do we even believe that a soy-protein-nugget would be better for a lion than the wildebeest it is hunting naturally? In the same way that I trust a lion to be able to feed itself, I trust that a chicken, given an open environment, will also be able to choose the food which is best suited to it’s needs.

Food for thought on the issue:

So the question you have to ask yourself, when considering which eggs to buy is this: “Is there a difference?” To me, the issue is one of democracy. Think of your money as a vote. Each time you seek out, and choose farm-raised pastured eggs, you are voting. You are voting with your dollars for more farms to raise pastured chickens and eggs. So, in the spirit of the just-ended political season: Get out there and vote!

4 thoughts on “Weekend Food Commentary

    • Thanks Rachel! I’ve been seeing a lot of chicken-related issues lately, like “all vegetarian fed chickens” in the grocery store, advertised like it’s a good thing. I figured I would get my “weekend commentary started with a simple topic, like eggs.
      It’s great to see that you and I are on the same page – voting with our dollars for good, healthy foods to be available!

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